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Magic Johnson’s animated story on Michael Jordan, the gambling-golf-playing-Olympic cyborg. 

If you still believe that Michael Jordan’s human you probably still think that the Lakers are winning a championship this year. 

via

@Suga_Shane

The Dream Team loves McDonald’s.

It’s the quote that spread like wildfire in Blackwater Bay. And a day after Kobe Bryant’s somewhat careless analysis of the original Dream Team there are already two Dream Teamers on record with their response.
The first was Charles Barkley who said he laughed at the comparison. Then today Michael Jordan told The Associated Press who caught up with him at a golf tournament in Charlotte that he “absolutely laughed.”
But before we get to more of MJ’s response a little context:

Nobody took Gatorade’s “Like Mike” jingle to heart as closely as the second greatest shooting guard in NBA history Kobe Bryant, and why not? Pattern your game after the player considered to be the best in the history of the sport seems like sound judgment, but that comparison extends beyond just the basketball court.
Throughout his playing career Kobe has matured greatly into a player willing to harness his ambition to fit the needs of his team. He is a callous leader and that is meant with complete respect. His maturity came at a crossroads in his career and his life after the fallout of his rape trial when Kobe stopped caring about how many people liked him. The “black mamba” could be like Mike but he could never be liked as much as Mike was liked. (Dwight take notes)
Still there was a time in Kobe’s maturing years when Jordan was his only mirror. He talked like MJ, he walked like MJ, he even celebrated like MJ. “And doggone it people like me.” There’s that mirror again.

Restless Kobe was a thing of the past and Kobe always seemed restless: whether it was with Shaq, or his own father, or his nightmare rape trial. You could perceive that restlessness to be born out of insecurity. Call it a “Jordan complex,” as if Jordan doesn’t have enough of that his own self.
I still remember Kobe in interviews telling those who would listen that his childhood idol was pass first point guard Magic Johnson. It’s quite possible that answer was out of sheer loyalty for the jersey. Or it may have been *gasp* a genuine answer. We’re all such cynics. But in the end his answer never really mattered. Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Something that the player most closely tied to Jordan could appreciate:

“I think he reminds a lot of people of Michael because he molded his game after him. He seems to have a lot of Michael’s charisma, and it comes across in the way he walks, the way he talks, and especially the way he plays.”
—Scottie Pippen on Kobe Bean


Which brings us full circle to today’s quote from Jordan about the imaginary Dream Teams matchup. To my knowledge Jordan has never talked publicly about the imitative comparison in style between himself and Kobe. Point of fact he did not address it today either. But I like to read into things because it’s fun and it’s summer. So pay attention to this quote from Jordan. In particular the last two sentences:

“For him (Kobe) to make comparisons, it’s one of those things where it creates conversation. I guess we’ll never know. I’d like to think that we had 11 Hall of Famers on that team and whenever they get 11 Hall of Famers you call and ask me who had the better Dream Team. Remember now, they learned from us. We didn’t learn from them.”

MJ had more to say about the two teams comparative athleticism, age, and skill. All of his remarks seemed to have been said in a jocular nature befitting a retired jock. But it was that last sentence… “They learned from us. We didn’t learn from them.”
The words used were they, us, we, and them but lets face it. It may as well have been he, me, I, and him.
—@SlapClap

It’s the quote that spread like wildfire in Blackwater Bay. And a day after Kobe Bryant’s somewhat careless analysis of the original Dream Team there are already two Dream Teamers on record with their response.

The first was Charles Barkley who said he laughed at the comparison. Then today Michael Jordan told The Associated Press who caught up with him at a golf tournament in Charlotte that he “absolutely laughed.”

But before we get to more of MJ’s response a little context:

Nobody took Gatorade’s “Like Mike” jingle to heart as closely as the second greatest shooting guard in NBA history Kobe Bryant, and why not? Pattern your game after the player considered to be the best in the history of the sport seems like sound judgment, but that comparison extends beyond just the basketball court.

Throughout his playing career Kobe has matured greatly into a player willing to harness his ambition to fit the needs of his team. He is a callous leader and that is meant with complete respect. His maturity came at a crossroads in his career and his life after the fallout of his rape trial when Kobe stopped caring about how many people liked him. The “black mamba” could be like Mike but he could never be liked as much as Mike was liked. (Dwight take notes)

Still there was a time in Kobe’s maturing years when Jordan was his only mirror. He talked like MJ, he walked like MJ, he even celebrated like MJ. “And doggone it people like me.” There’s that mirror again.

Restless Kobe was a thing of the past and Kobe always seemed restless: whether it was with Shaq, or his own father, or his nightmare rape trial. You could perceive that restlessness to be born out of insecurity. Call it a “Jordan complex,” as if Jordan doesn’t have enough of that his own self.

I still remember Kobe in interviews telling those who would listen that his childhood idol was pass first point guard Magic Johnson. It’s quite possible that answer was out of sheer loyalty for the jersey. Or it may have been *gasp* a genuine answer. We’re all such cynics. But in the end his answer never really mattered. Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. Something that the player most closely tied to Jordan could appreciate:

I think he reminds a lot of people of Michael because he molded his game after him. He seems to have a lot of Michael’s charisma, and it comes across in the way he walks, the way he talks, and especially the way he plays.”

Scottie Pippen on Kobe Bean

Which brings us full circle to today’s quote from Jordan about the imaginary Dream Teams matchup. To my knowledge Jordan has never talked publicly about the imitative comparison in style between himself and Kobe. Point of fact he did not address it today either. But I like to read into things because it’s fun and it’s summer. So pay attention to this quote from Jordan. In particular the last two sentences:

“For him (Kobe) to make comparisons, it’s one of those things where it creates conversation. I guess we’ll never know. I’d like to think that we had 11 Hall of Famers on that team and whenever they get 11 Hall of Famers you call and ask me who had the better Dream Team. Remember now, they learned from us. We didn’t learn from them.”

MJ had more to say about the two teams comparative athleticism, age, and skill. All of his remarks seemed to have been said in a jocular nature befitting a retired jock. But it was that last sentence… “They learned from us. We didn’t learn from them.”

The words used were they, us, we, and them but lets face it. It may as well have been he, me, I, and him.

@SlapClap

I just started laughing. How old is Kobe Bryant? He’s 34? And he’s calling us old? At the time, we were only like 28, 29. Michael Jordan and me were the same age. We were both 29. Other than Kobe, LeBron and Kevin Durant, I don’t think anybody else on that team makes our team.

Sir Charles’ response to Kobe’s assertion that the 2012 Olympic team could beat the original Dream Team partly because of age.

Barkley makes a good point. The Dream Team only had two players past their prime in Bird and Magic. And Magic looked to have a lot left in the tank according to the recent documentary. Meanwhile everybody else on that team was in or entering their prime.

What people lose sight of is that, unlike with todays game where college players are 1 and done, an NBA player’s prime years used to be his late 20’s-early 30s. Grown men doing grown up stuff. Because of early eligibility todays player reaches his apex, well… earlier. Usually his mid-to-late 20’s (LeBron, Wade, Bosh). In other words, the guys on the Dream Team were not old. They were masters.

So who do you think would win this dream matchup: Dream Team or Redeem Team II? And remember,

Jordan

He coached the Bad Boys. And if you can coach those assholes, you can coach anybody.
— Charles Barkley (on Chuck Daly)
gq:

The Dream Will Never Die:An Oral History of the Dream Team
Magic. Bird. Jordan. Barkley. Ewing. Legends at every position on the floor. Hall of Famers filling the bench. They were the greatest team ever assembled—in any sport—and twenty years ago in Barcelona, they put on a show the world will never forget. GQ contributor Lang Whitaker spent months assembling this one, and it reads like lightning. (Also, stay tuned this week to GQ.com: lots of outtakes to come.) So many great bits from the oral history to choose from, but this portion, about the legendary first scrimmage between the Dream Team and a squad of college all-stars, is a personal favorite:

Allan Houston (college squad player): We were asked to play a style that they hadn’t really seen a lot of yet. We figured we had nothing to lose. So we go in there, and Penny gets a couple dunks. I remember hitting a couple of shots. Everybody’s kind of flowing.
Penny Hardaway (college squad player): They just thought, “Okay, they got these young guys to give us a little warm-up. We’re going to beat them up a little bit, sign a couple autographs, and then everybody go on about their merry way.” They didn’t know how talented we really were.
Brian McIntyre (NBA vice president of public relations): Penny had a couple of steals at midcourt, and everyone was going, “Whoa.” There was—I can still feel it—there was tension. First day!
Charles Barkley: The first time we saw them, they looked like babies. We were like, “Hey, man, let’s don’t kill these little kids.” And they were playing like it was Game 7. Before we knew it, they upset us.
Houston: The clock ran out—we had a twenty-minute clock—and we were up. And everybody looked around sheepishly, like, This is not supposed to happen. Nobody said anything for a few minutes.
Karl Malone: We took them for granted, and they kicked our butt. And Coach Daly just had that look on his face like, “Well, this is what we told you guys. You gotta be ready.” After that, we was chomping at the bit to play them again that same day, but he didn’t let us. He let us stew on it a little bit.
Chris Webber (college squad player): When we busted their ass, they didn’t say any prima donna stuff—”We let you win.” That night was special. I remember me and Bobby Hurley decimating the golf course on some golf carts because we were so excited.
Houston: Back at the hotel, I was on the same elevator as Bird and C-Webb, and C-Webb was chirping. Bird got off the elevator and said, “Don’t worry, tomorrow’s a new day.” He kind of left us with that thought. And yeah, we got back in there, and it was a new day. [laughs] 
Barkley: We sent them a little message.
Webber: We didn’t score a point. Not one point. Not a point on a free throw, not a point in the game. We were the perfect wake-up call for them, and they were the perfect reality check for us.
McIntyre: When the buzzer sounded, Barkley walks over to the other bench and says, “You guys are just lucky we didn’t come out with an attitude today.” Just cracked me up.

gq:

The Dream Will Never Die:
An Oral History of the Dream Team

Magic. Bird. Jordan. Barkley. Ewing. Legends at every position on the floor. Hall of Famers filling the bench. They were the greatest team ever assembled—in any sport—and twenty years ago in Barcelona, they put on a show the world will never forget. GQ contributor Lang Whitaker spent months assembling this one, and it reads like lightning. (Also, stay tuned this week to GQ.com: lots of outtakes to come.) So many great bits from the oral history to choose from, but this portion, about the legendary first scrimmage between the Dream Team and a squad of college all-stars, is a personal favorite:

Allan Houston (college squad player): We were asked to play a style that they hadn’t really seen a lot of yet. We figured we had nothing to lose. So we go in there, and Penny gets a couple dunks. I remember hitting a couple of shots. Everybody’s kind of flowing.

Penny Hardaway (college squad player): They just thought, “Okay, they got these young guys to give us a little warm-up. We’re going to beat them up a little bit, sign a couple autographs, and then everybody go on about their merry way.” They didn’t know how talented we really were.

Brian McIntyre (NBA vice president of public relations): Penny had a couple of steals at midcourt, and everyone was going, “Whoa.” There was—I can still feel it—there was tension. First day!

Charles Barkley: The first time we saw them, they looked like babies. We were like, “Hey, man, let’s don’t kill these little kids.” And they were playing like it was Game 7. Before we knew it, they upset us.

Houston: The clock ran out—we had a twenty-minute clock—and we were up. And everybody looked around sheepishly, like, This is not supposed to happen. Nobody said anything for a few minutes.

Karl Malone: We took them for granted, and they kicked our butt. And Coach Daly just had that look on his face like, “Well, this is what we told you guys. You gotta be ready.” After that, we was chomping at the bit to play them again that same day, but he didn’t let us. He let us stew on it a little bit.

Chris Webber (college squad player): When we busted their ass, they didn’t say any prima donna stuff—”We let you win.” That night was special. I remember me and Bobby Hurley decimating the golf course on some golf carts because we were so excited.

Houston: Back at the hotel, I was on the same elevator as Bird and C-Webb, and C-Webb was chirping. Bird got off the elevator and said, “Don’t worry, tomorrow’s a new day.” He kind of left us with that thought. And yeah, we got back in there, and it was a new day. [laughs]

Barkley: We sent them a little message.

Webber: We didn’t score a point. Not one point. Not a point on a free throw, not a point in the game. We were the perfect wake-up call for them, and they were the perfect reality check for us.

McIntyre: When the buzzer sounded, Barkley walks over to the other bench and says, “You guys are just lucky we didn’t come out with an attitude today.” Just cracked me up.

NBA OFFSEASON COMMERCIAL BREAK.

via oakleyandallen:

O&A: McDonald’s & the Dream Team.

Happy Holidays.

O&A: The Dream Team vs. Croatia

Song: DJ Quik “Jet Set”

via: oakleyandallen

Dream Team highlights. That’s all.

24seconds:

USA Basketball: USA National Team Photos - July 21

You think CP3 and Mike D’Antoni are working on their secret Knicks handshake? Picture this: Madison Square Garden with Amar’e Stoudemire, Chris Paul, and (wishful thinking) Carmelo Anthony in the starting lineup. Somewhere Alicia Keys is preparing to write a new song. 
Sidenote: rather ironic that in “Empire State of Mind” Jay-Z name drops both LeBron and Wade…

24seconds:

USA Basketball: USA National Team Photos - July 21

You think CP3 and Mike D’Antoni are working on their secret Knicks handshake? Picture this: Madison Square Garden with Amar’e Stoudemire, Chris Paul, and (wishful thinking) Carmelo Anthony in the starting lineup. Somewhere Alicia Keys is preparing to write a new song. 

Sidenote: rather ironic that in “Empire State of Mind” Jay-Z name drops both LeBron and Wade…

I got nothin. Reblog this with your best caption. Winner gets to have their face tattooed on DeShawn Stevenson’s neck.
(via hipsterrunoff)

I got nothin. Reblog this with your best caption. Winner gets to have their face tattooed on DeShawn Stevenson’s neck.

(via hipsterrunoff)

Great read over at CNNSI.com about the blowup between Isiah Thomas and Magic Johnson over Magic’s upcoming book “When the Game Was Ours.” In it, Magic accuses Isiah of questioning his sexuality. There’s also this gem:
“Isiah killed his own chances when it came to the Olympics. Nobody on that team wanted to play with him. … Michael didn’t want to play with him. Scottie [Pippen] wanted no part of him. Bird wasn’t pushing for him. Karl Malone didn’t want him. Who was saying, ‘We need this guy?’ Nobody.”

Great read over at CNNSI.com about the blowup between Isiah Thomas and Magic Johnson over Magic’s upcoming book “When the Game Was Ours.” In it, Magic accuses Isiah of questioning his sexuality. There’s also this gem:

Isiah killed his own chances when it came to the Olympics. Nobody on that team wanted to play with him. … Michael didn’t want to play with him. Scottie [Pippen] wanted no part of him. Bird wasn’t pushing for him. Karl Malone didn’t want him. Who was saying, ‘We need this guy?’ Nobody.

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