Sections

Search for Posts

Contributors

sbnation:

Dr. J dunking as a 63-year-old, nbd.

The video stops because LeBron came out of nowhere & blocked Dr. J’s shot.

fuckyeanba:

Ain’t gonna lie, this is what I’m most looking forward to this summer: Dr. J on NBA TV during the Finals.

I’ve been reading Terry Pluto’s book on the ABA, Loose Balls, in preparation. 

Dr. J has been forgotten by an entire generation of NBA fans. Glad NBAtv is letting the Doctor do a house call. 

inthepaintboston:

Opening night tickets are sold out!

There is a waitlist so sign up for that if you are interested in coming on Friday night - if a spot opens up, you will be contacted! http://inthepaintbos.eventbrite.com/

If you have your ticket already, hope to see you at the show’s opening at Voltage Coffee and Art in Cambridge, MA on Friday, April 26th!

If you are unable to attend the opening, the show will run until May 18th.

Top images via In The Paint artist bobbybernethy.

In honor of Dr. J’s birthday…VHS footage of him teaching you how to play basketball.

(Pt. II & III)

Basketball is very simple. You can stand out there and you can take what they give you. Or you can take what you think you want.

image

Dr. J

Vintage Rick Barry and Dr. J comic advertisement for Spalding

Vintage Rick Barry and Dr. J comic advertisement for Spalding

(Source: comicscans)

NBA Lockout Classics: Dr. J vs. Magic & Kareem, 1982 NBA Finals, Game 6. 

Yesterday we had a game that featured Jordan, Pippen, Kobe and Shaq. That’s such a surreal game, if you think about it. Four legends sharing the same court, battling for a lot more than just a ‘W’, especially between MJ and Kobe. Today we have Kareem, Magic, the man that no one can hate even with his terrible ESPN commentary, and Dr. J, one of the greatest players that people forget about.  

Lakers came into this game leading the series 3-2 after stealing the first game of the Finals on the road. Dr. J put up 30 points while Magic went for 13-13-13. 

Philly and Los Angeles would meet again the following year in the 1983 NBA Finals, where Philly would sweep Magic and the Lakers in the infamous “Fo-fo-fo" Sixers’ championship run. 

This game predates Basketball-Reference’s boxscore database but here’s the Wiki page for the series

Tomorrow we’ll have some classic Jordan vs. ‘Nique action.

via @Marco_Romo

@Suga_Shane

grantlehner:

gotemcoach:

Five of the Greatest Dunkers of All-Time…
…and if you’re rating them just on their ability to stuff it, Kobe’s the worst…
…by a mile.
Got ‘Em

By a kilometer

MJ always gets the middle

grantlehner:

gotemcoach:

Five of the Greatest Dunkers of All-Time…

…and if you’re rating them just on their ability to stuff it, Kobe’s the worst…

…by a mile.

Got ‘Em

By a kilometer

MJ always gets the middle

thegreatlookbook:

- Ames Bros Design

thegreatlookbook:

- Ames Bros Design

Throwback Photo of the Day: Ronald Reagan with the 1983 NBA Champs Philadelphia 76ers (Dr. J and Moses Malone in the background)

Throwback Photo of the Day: Ronald Reagan with the 1983 NBA Champs Philadelphia 76ers (Dr. J and Moses Malone in the background)

6 days left until the 2010-11 NBA season tips off.
Brought to you by Dr. Julius Erving, M.D.
Dr. J was the original funkadelic. He didn’t just play basketball, he performed a high flying trapeze act on a nightly basis. It’s hard to believe but Erving didn’t invent the dunk, he nearly perfected the art form. Gliding from hardwood to hoop, every drive was sure to end in a rim rocking dunk or an electrifying highlight.
The doc looked surreal soaring through the skies of NBA and ABA arenas everywhere. His 6’6” frame, elongated by those tiny shorts, giant afro, and those massive hands. Those hands, they were the secret weapon. Clenching the ball like a lions jaw clenches its prey, guiding the ball in whatever direction he wanted. Those hands made all those high flying dunks possible. They gave him the gift of the reverse lay-ups from behind the back board. They gave him the ability to drop 30 points a night without a reliable jumper. 
Julius first broke onto the seen not in the NBA but making hay in the ABA. In five years he racked up 11,662 points, 2 championships and 3 MVPs. The NBA and ABA merged and Philidunkia was his new home. Although Julius found himself playing for a title in his first year, his individual stats took some time to adjust to the subtle differences of the NBA. Within a few years, his scoring was back up in the stratosphere and he had played in three different NBA Finals, losing all three (‘76, ‘79, ‘81). Finally in 1983 the addition of Moses Malone put the 6ers over the top, sweeping the Lakers in four. Erving would go on to score 18,364 points in the NBA, add a league MVP to his hardware collection and give us one of the most underrated rivalries in NBA history; Bird vs. Dr J (NO, not the video game).
Dr. J was from the future, sent back to save basketball. During an era where two leagues fought for dominance, it was Julius Erving that dominated all, on or off the court. Dr J was one of the first pro-basketball players to endorse products and star in movies. In the words of his coach, Billy Cunningham,

"Julius was the first player I ever remember who transcended sports."

In most ways, Dr. J was ahead of his time. Stuck playing in the 70’s and 80’s with the game and athleticism of those from the 90’s and 00’s. In today’s NBA, Julius would headline Sport Center’s Top 10 on a nightly basis. His dunks would have 10 million views. His afro would inspire an entire generation of kids to boycott barbershops.
Through the years he gave a lot to NBA fans. He gave the never-happy fans of Philadelphia something to cheer about. He gave generations of future NBAers highlights like ”Rock the Baby” & “The Baseline Move”. He helped start the trend of high dollar off-court endorsements. And, if nothing else, at least he gave us another famous “Doc”. 




Rock the Baby on Cooper




The Baseline Move





"Here I was, trying to win a championship, and my mouth just dropped open. He actually did that! I thought, ‘What should we do? Should we take the ball out, or should we give him the ball back and ask him to do it again?’ It’s still the greatest move I’ve ever seen in a basketball game, the all-time greatest." – Magic Johnson on the Baseline Move.

@Suga_Shane

6 days left until the 2010-11 NBA season tips off.

Brought to you by Dr. Julius Erving, M.D.

Dr. J was the original funkadelic. He didn’t just play basketball, he performed a high flying trapeze act on a nightly basis. It’s hard to believe but Erving didn’t invent the dunk, he nearly perfected the art form. Gliding from hardwood to hoop, every drive was sure to end in a rim rocking dunk or an electrifying highlight.

The doc looked surreal soaring through the skies of NBA and ABA arenas everywhere. His 6’6” frame, elongated by those tiny shorts, giant afro, and those massive hands. Those hands, they were the secret weapon. Clenching the ball like a lions jaw clenches its prey, guiding the ball in whatever direction he wanted. Those hands made all those high flying dunks possible. They gave him the gift of the reverse lay-ups from behind the back board. They gave him the ability to drop 30 points a night without a reliable jumper. 

Julius first broke onto the seen not in the NBA but making hay in the ABA. In five years he racked up 11,662 points, 2 championships and 3 MVPs. The NBA and ABA merged and Philidunkia was his new home. Although Julius found himself playing for a title in his first year, his individual stats took some time to adjust to the subtle differences of the NBA. Within a few years, his scoring was back up in the stratosphere and he had played in three different NBA Finals, losing all three (‘76, ‘79, ‘81). Finally in 1983 the addition of Moses Malone put the 6ers over the top, sweeping the Lakers in four. Erving would go on to score 18,364 points in the NBA, add a league MVP to his hardware collection and give us one of the most underrated rivalries in NBA history; Bird vs. Dr J (NO, not the video game).

Dr. J was from the future, sent back to save basketball. During an era where two leagues fought for dominance, it was Julius Erving that dominated all, on or off the court. Dr J was one of the first pro-basketball players to endorse products and star in movies. In the words of his coach, Billy Cunningham,

"Julius was the first player I ever remember who transcended sports."

In most ways, Dr. J was ahead of his time. Stuck playing in the 70’s and 80’s with the game and athleticism of those from the 90’s and 00’s. In today’s NBA, Julius would headline Sport Center’s Top 10 on a nightly basis. His dunks would have 10 million views. His afro would inspire an entire generation of kids to boycott barbershops.

Through the years he gave a lot to NBA fans. He gave the never-happy fans of Philadelphia something to cheer about. He gave generations of future NBAers highlights like ”Rock the Baby” & “The Baseline Move”. He helped start the trend of high dollar off-court endorsements. And, if nothing else, at least he gave us another famous “Doc”

Rock the Baby on Cooper

The Baseline Move

"Here I was, trying to win a championship, and my mouth just dropped open. He actually did that! I thought, ‘What should we do? Should we take the ball out, or should we give him the ball back and ask him to do it again?’ It’s still the greatest move I’ve ever seen in a basketball game, the all-time greatest." – Magic Johnson on the Baseline Move.

@Suga_Shane

What do you think this was over? Hall & Oates tickets?
[slapclap]

What do you think this was over? Hall & Oates tickets?

[slapclap]

© 2011 NBA Off-Season. This site is in no way affiliated with the National Basketball Association. We're just a group of people who like to watch the NBA is all. All images and video are under copyright of the National Basketball Association unless otherwise noted.