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I want my best player who has the best chance of getting a foul call and with the most experience in these situations taking that shot. When you are that player, as guys like Jordan understood, it’s not only so much getting the attention but taking the pressure off others and putting it where it should be. With excess defensive pressure, sure, give it up. But without that it’s your shot and your responsibility, and Rose understands that.
— Longtime Chicago Bulls beat writer Sam Smith uses the Derrick Rose game winner from last night to talk about “hero shots.” The accepted philosophy that your best player should always take the last shot has been called into question by the new math. Smith who fits the part of a jockey agent on HBO’s Luck has a less stats-centric take on the matter.
Yes, Kobe ranted about leaving, but more as a reaction against management. He ran Shaq out. He always knew he could win. He’s a competitor. (Derrick) Rose is too. He never wants someone special. He didn’t go chasing after LeBron. Same with Kevin Durant in Oklahoma City. They’re good, and like the good kid at the playground, just give him four guys and he’ll figure it out.
— Sam Smith, blogging old school.
Jordan Rules
Michael Jordan may be the best to ever play this game and is one of the most unanimously respected and likable athletes of all time, but the Michael away from the cameras and inside the locker rooms was a slightly different person from what the ad agencies had so perfectly painted.
At the prime of Michael’s career, Sam Smith’s The Jordan Rules was the book that shed much light on what actually happened behind the scenes of Chicago’s great run in the 90’s. Mike hates Isaiah! Horace hates Mike! Scottie demands a trade! The trash talking! The fights! The Egos! The politics of basketball! And if you were a kid in Mrs. Riley’s 7th grade English Lit class reading books for research for your presentation during Heroes Week, then it shook up your perceptions as to who that man really was whose posters adorned your bedroom walls.
I’ve since re-read this book and what I can attest is that Sam Smith officially made me a fan of the game. It was one thing as a kid growing up idolizing Mike as we all did, but then you realize that there is an entire world that happens behind the games you watch on TV, which is even more fascinating. That point, I believe, is the point you become a fan. Or better still, you appreciate it. You appreciate what the Bulls did even more because of all their flaws. It’s that moment when the spectator becomes less fixated on the plays and more on the players and the staff and the dynamics which mold that team together.
This book made me appreciate basketball the same way Peter Biskind’s Easy Riders, Raging Bulls made me appreciate filmmaking and the way the 33⅓  series makes you appreciate music.
Celebrate the birthday of His Airness proper by purchasing/reading this book if you haven’t already.
(Mark)

Jordan Rules

Michael Jordan may be the best to ever play this game and is one of the most unanimously respected and likable athletes of all time, but the Michael away from the cameras and inside the locker rooms was a slightly different person from what the ad agencies had so perfectly painted.

At the prime of Michael’s career, Sam Smith’s The Jordan Rules was the book that shed much light on what actually happened behind the scenes of Chicago’s great run in the 90’s. Mike hates Isaiah! Horace hates Mike! Scottie demands a trade! The trash talking! The fights! The Egos! The politics of basketball! And if you were a kid in Mrs. Riley’s 7th grade English Lit class reading books for research for your presentation during Heroes Week, then it shook up your perceptions as to who that man really was whose posters adorned your bedroom walls.

I’ve since re-read this book and what I can attest is that Sam Smith officially made me a fan of the game. It was one thing as a kid growing up idolizing Mike as we all did, but then you realize that there is an entire world that happens behind the games you watch on TV, which is even more fascinating. That point, I believe, is the point you become a fan. Or better still, you appreciate it. You appreciate what the Bulls did even more because of all their flaws. It’s that moment when the spectator becomes less fixated on the plays and more on the players and the staff and the dynamics which mold that team together.

This book made me appreciate basketball the same way Peter Biskind’s Easy Riders, Raging Bulls made me appreciate filmmaking and the way the 33⅓  series makes you appreciate music.

Celebrate the birthday of His Airness proper by purchasing/reading this book if you haven’t already.

(Mark)

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